POLIVY was studied in the first and only pivotal, randomized trial in R/R DLBCL vs BR1

POLIVY was approved based on Study GO29365, a randomized, phase II, open-label study in patients with R/R DLBCL (N=80)1,3

 

Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive either POLIVY+BR or BR for six 21-day cycles.1

Study design for POLIVY® (polatuzumab vedotin-piiq)+BR in patients with previously treated DLBCL
  • Inclusion criteria: Patients received at least 1 prior regimen and were not candidates for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at study entry1
  • Exclusion criteria: Patients with Grade 2 or higher peripheral neuropathy, prior allogeneic HSCT, active central nervous system lymphoma, or transformed lymphoma1

Following premedication with an antihistamine and an antipyretic, POLIVY was given by intravenous (IV) infusion at 1.8 mg/kg on Day 2 of cycle 1 and on Day 1 of cycles 2 to 6.1*
Bendamustine was dosed at 90 mg/m2 intravenously on Days 2 and 3 of cycle 1 and on Days 1 and 2 of cycles 2 to 6.1
A rituximab product was administered at a dose of 375 mg/m2 intravenously on Day 1 of cycles 1 to 6. Each cycle was 21 days in length.1

*Dosing protocol in Study GO29365.
Please see the Dosing page and full Prescribing Information for recommended dosing schedule.

Primary Endpoint1,3 Select Additional Endpoints1,3
  • Complete response (CR) as assessed by an independent review committee (IRC)
    • Measured by PET-CT at EOT
  • Objective response rate at EOT (ORR; IRC assessed)
  • Best overall response of CR or partial response (PR)
  • Duration of response (DoR) as assessed by IRC


EOT was defined as 6 to 8 weeks after Day 1 of cycle 6 or last study treatment.
PET-CT results were prioritized over CT results.
PET-CT=positron emission tomography–computed tomography; EOT=end of treatment; CT=computed tomography.

 

POLIVY+BR was studied in a broad range of patients with R/R DLBCL, including those who were primary refractory and/or double expressors1,3

POLIVY® (polatuzumab vedotin-piiq) for R/R DLBCL Baseline Characteristics

§Central pathology review incorporated results of NanoString cell of origin when available.
||Of patients tested for MYC/BCL2 overexpression, POLIVY+BR had 11 patients with double-expressor lymphoma (DEL) and 12 patients with non-DEL; BR had 6 patients with DEL and 13 patients with non-DEL. Not all patients were assessed for DEL.
Defined as no response, progression, or relapse within 6 months of last anti-lymphoma therapy end date.
#Patients were refractory to first prior anti-cancer therapy.
ECOG PS=Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status; ABC=activated B-cell type; GCB=germinal center B-cell–like.

 

Indication

POLIVY in combination with bendamustine and a rituximab product is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), not otherwise specified, after at least 2 prior therapies.

Accelerated approval was granted for this indication based on complete response rate. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in a confirmatory trial.

Peripheral Neuropathy
POLIVY can cause severe peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy occurs as early as the first cycle of treatment and is cumulative. POLIVY may exacerbate preexisting peripheral neuropathy.

In Study GO29365, of 173 patients treated with POLIVY, 40% reported new or worsening peripheral neuropathy, with a median time to onset of 2.1 months. The peripheral neuropathy was Grade 1 in 26% of cases, Grade 2 in 12%, and Grade 3 in 2.3%. Peripheral neuropathy resulted in POLIVY dose reduction in 3% of treated patients, dose delay in 1.2%, and permanent discontinuation in 2.9%. Sixty-five percent of patients reported improvement or resolution of peripheral neuropathy, after a median time to resolution of 1 month, and 48% reported complete resolution.

The peripheral neuropathy is predominantly sensory; however, motor and sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy also occur. Monitor for symptoms of peripheral neuropathy such as hypoesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, dysesthesia, neuropathic pain, burning sensation, weakness, or gait disturbance. Patients experiencing new or worsening peripheral neuropathy may require a delay, dose reduction, or discontinuation of POLIVY.

Infusion-Related Reactions
POLIVY can cause severe infusion reactions. Delayed infusion-related reactions as late as 24 hours after receiving POLIVY have occurred. With premedication, 7% of patients (12/173) in Study GO29365 reported infusion-related reactions after the administration of POLIVY. The reactions were Grade 1 in 67% of patients, Grade 2 in 25%, and Grade 3 in 8%. Symptoms included fever, chills, flushing, dyspnea, hypotension, facial swelling, and urticaria.

Administer an antihistamine and an antipyretic prior to the administration of POLIVY, and monitor patients closely throughout the infusion. If an infusion-related reaction occurs, interrupt the infusion and institute appropriate medical management.

Myelosuppression
Treatment with POLIVY can cause serious or severe myelosuppression, including neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. In patients treated with POLIVY plus bendamustine and a rituximab product (BR) (n=45), 42% received primary prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Grade 3 or higher hematologic adverse reactions included neutropenia (42%), thrombocytopenia (40%), anemia (24%), lymphopenia (13%), and febrile neutropenia (11%). Grade 4 hematologic adverse reactions included neutropenia (24%), thrombocytopenia (16%), lymphopenia (9%), and febrile neutropenia (4.4%). Cytopenias were the most common reason for treatment discontinuation (18% of all patients).

Monitor complete blood counts throughout treatment. Cytopenias may require a delay, dose reduction, or discontinuation of POLIVY. Consider prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration.

Serious and Opportunistic Infections
Fatal and/or serious infections, including opportunistic infections such as sepsis, pneumonia (including Pneumocystis jiroveci and other fungal pneumonia), herpesvirus infection, and cytomegalovirus infection, have occurred in patients treated with POLIVY.

Grade 3 or higher infections occurred in 32% (55/173) of patients treated with POLIVY. Infection-related deaths were reported in 2.9% of patients within 90 days of last treatment.

Closely monitor patients during treatment for signs of infection. Administer prophylaxis for Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and herpesvirus.

Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML)
PML has been reported after treatment with POLIVY (0.6%, 1/173). Monitor for new or worsening neurological, cognitive, or behavioral changes. Hold POLIVY and any concomitant chemotherapy if PML is suspected, and permanently discontinue if the diagnosis is confirmed.

Tumor Lysis Syndrome
POLIVY may cause tumor lysis syndrome. Patients with high tumor burden and rapidly proliferating tumors may be at increased risk of tumor lysis syndrome. Monitor closely and take appropriate measures, including tumor lysis syndrome prophylaxis.

Hepatotoxicity
Serious cases of hepatotoxicity that were consistent with hepatocellular injury, including elevations of transaminases and/or bilirubin, have occurred in patients treated with POLIVY.

In recipients of POLIVY in Study GO29365 (n=173), Grade 3 and 4 transaminase elevations of AST and/or ALT developed in 1.9% and 1.9%, respectively. Laboratory values suggestive of drug-induced liver injury (both an ALT or AST greater than 3 times upper limit of normal [ULN] and total bilirubin greater than 2 times ULN) occurred in 2.3% of patients.

Preexisting liver disease, elevated baseline liver enzymes, and concomitant medications may increase the risk of hepatotoxicity. Monitor liver enzymes and bilirubin level.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity
Based on the mechanism of action and findings from animal studies, POLIVY can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. When administered to rats, the small molecule component of POLIVY, monomethyl auristatin E, caused adverse developmental outcomes, including embryo-fetal mortality and structural abnormalities, at exposures below those occurring clinically at the recommended dose.

Advise pregnant women of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with POLIVY and for at least 3 months after the last dose. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with POLIVY and for at least 5 months after the last dose.

The Most Common Adverse Reactions
The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) included neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, diarrhea, pyrexia, decreased appetite, and pneumonia.

Lactation
Advise women not to breastfeed during treatment with POLIVY and for at least 2 months after the last dose.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at 1-888-835-2555.

Please see the full Prescribing Information for additional Important Safety Information.

    • POLIVY Prescribing Information. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc.; September 2020.

      POLIVY Prescribing Information. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc.; September 2020.

    • Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for B-Cell Lymphomas V.2.2020. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Accessed January 27, 2020. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.

      Referenced with permission from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for B-Cell Lymphomas V.2.2020. © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. 2020. All rights reserved. Accessed January 27, 2020. To view the most recent and complete version of the guideline, go online to NCCN.org.

    • Sehn LH, Herrera AF, Flowers CR, et al. Polatuzumab vedotin in relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol. 2020;38(2):155-165.

      Sehn LH, Herrera AF, Flowers CR, et al. Polatuzumab vedotin in relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. J Clin Oncol. 2020;38(2):155-165.

    • Data on File. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc. 2018.

      Data on File. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc. 2018.

    • D’Arena G, Musto P, Cascavilla N, Dell’Olio M, Di Renzo N, Carotenuto M. Quantitative flow cytometry for the differential diagnosis of leukemic B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. Am J Hematol. 2000;64(4):275-281.

      D’Arena G, Musto P, Cascavilla N, Dell’Olio M, Di Renzo N, Carotenuto M. Quantitative flow cytometry for the differential diagnosis of leukemic B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders. Am J Hematol. 2000;64(4):275-281.

    • Dornan D, Bennett F, Chen Y, et al. Therapeutic potential of an anti-CD79b antibody-drug conjugate, anti-CD79b-vc-MMAE, for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood. 2009;114(13):2721-2729.

      Dornan D, Bennett F, Chen Y, et al. Therapeutic potential of an anti-CD79b antibody-drug conjugate, anti-CD79b-vc-MMAE, for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Blood. 2009;114(13):2721-2729.

    • Friedberg JW. Relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2011;2011(1):498-505.

      Friedberg JW. Relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2011;2011(1):498-505.

    • Crump M, Neelapu SS, Farooq U, et al. Outcomes in refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: results from the international SCHOLAR-1 study. Blood. 2017;130(16):1800-1808.

      Crump M, Neelapu SS, Farooq U, et al. Outcomes in refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: results from the international SCHOLAR-1 study. Blood. 2017;130(16):1800-1808.

    • National Cancer Institute. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) V4. 2009.
      https://evs.nci.nih.gov/ftp1/CTCAE/CTCAE_4.03/CTCAE_4.03_2010-06-14_QuickReference_5x7.pdf. Accessed December 4, 2019.

      National Cancer Institute. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) V4. 2009.
      https://evs.nci.nih.gov/ftp1/CTCAE/CTCAE_4.03/CTCAE_4.03_2010-06-14_QuickReference_5x7.pdf. Accessed December 4, 2019.